Cycle of Destruction

Infestation may go unnoticed for the first one or two years of invasion — trees may show no symptoms, but by the third year after infestation, an affected tree will exhibit significant dieback. At the end of the fourth year after the infestation begins, the three has been killed. A year after death, the tree will become brittle and start to drop major limbs, which can pose obvious hazards. Within as little as 11 years of invasion, all trees in an extensive area can be wiped out. Unprepared cities and HOA’s may be overwhelmed and short on resources to have affected trees removed properly.

How to tell if a tree is affected by the Emerald Ash Borer

  • Dieback that begins with the upper third of the tree
  • Vertical splits in the tree’s bark
  • D-shaped holes (only about 1/8″ wide) in the tree’s bark. These holes are created as newly developed adults emerge.
  • Winding S-shaped channels under the tree’s bark
  • Heavy woodpecker activity — especially in winter months
  • Worm-like larvae under the tree’s bark — these can be up to 1″ long
  • Epicormic shoots — sprouts that grow up from the tree’s base

What do homeowners need to know about the Emerald Ash Borer invasion?

If you have ash trees on your property, invasion is imminent, so it is best to be prepared. First, determine if the trees are worth saving and if you want to.

Ash trees should be saved if:

  • they are healthy and growing, with at least half their leaves.
  • they are considered valuable to the landscaping.
  • the owner wants to keep them.
  • they are showing only minimal signs of EAB infestation.

Ash trees should NOT be saved if:

  • they are unhealthy — missing more than half their leaves.
  • planted in a bad location — such as near powerlines — or are not considered valuable to the landscaping.
  • they are showing advanced signs of EAB infestation, like woodpecker damage, bark splits, and water sprouts at the tree base.

If it is determined that a tree is not worth saving, it should be removed as soon as possible — preferably before it has died. If the decision has been made to fight for a tree or trees, it is critical to take preventative measures right away.

If at breast height, a tree has a diameter of less than 20 inches, a homeowner may choose to treat it himself by treating the tree with over the counter soil drench products containing 1.47% midacloprid. These products are most effective when applied between April 1st and May 15th.

If the tree’s diameter at breast height is greater than 20 inches, care should be left to a professional. 

What can you do to help combat the EAB infestation?

  1. Remove weak and/or affected trees from your landscaping right away.
  2. If you see these symptoms, and EAB has not yet been found in your county, (you can check here) please call the Indiana DNR hotline at 1-866 NO EXOTIC (1-866-663-9684). This helps the DNR keep track of the beetle’s activity and the extent of the infestation. Your private information is not shared.
  3. NEVER move firewood from region to region — this can perpetuate the spread of the infestation.
  4. When planning your landscaping and planting trees, think variety. A variety of trees helps making your landscaping more resilient to such infestations. Buy local, kiln-dried firewood.

Landscape Solutions provides services related to this infestation, from prevantative treatment to tree removal and replacement as appropriate. CONTACT US for more information. 

What You Need to Know

Cycle of Destruction

Infestation may go unnoticed for the first one or two years of invasion — trees may show no symptoms, but by the third year after infestation, an affected tree will exhibit significant dieback. At the end of the fourth year after the infestation begins, the three has been killed. A year after death, the tree will become brittle and start to drop major limbs, which can pose obvious hazards. Within as little as 11 years of invasion, all trees in an extensive area can be wiped out. Unprepared cities and HOA’s may be overwhelmed and short on resources to have affected trees removed properly.

How to tell if a tree is affected by the Emerald Ash Borer

  • Dieback that begins with the upper third of the tree
  • Vertical splits in the tree’s bark
  • D-shaped holes (only about 1/8″ wide) in the tree’s bark. These holes are created as newly developed adults emerge.
  • Winding S-shaped channels under the tree’s bark
  • Heavy woodpecker activity — especially in winter months
  • Worm-like larvae under the tree’s bark — these can be up to 1″ long
  • Epicormic shoots — sprouts that grow up from the tree’s base

What do homeowners need to know about the Emerald Ash Borer invasion?

If you have ash trees on your property, invasion is imminent, so it is best to be prepared. First, determine if the trees are worth saving and if you want to.

Ash trees should be saved if:

  • they are healthy and growing, with at least half their leaves.
  • they are considered valuable to the landscaping.
  • the owner wants to keep them.
  • they are showing only minimal signs of EAB infestation.

Ash trees should NOT be saved if:

  • they are unhealthy — missing more than half their leaves.
  • planted in a bad location — such as near powerlines — or are not considered valuable to the landscaping.
  • they are showing advanced signs of EAB infestation, like woodpecker damage, bark splits, and water sprouts at the tree base.

If it is determined that a tree is not worth saving, it should be removed as soon as possible — preferably before it has died. If the decision has been made to fight for a tree or trees, it is critical to take preventative measures right away.

If at breast height, a tree has a diameter of less than 20 inches, a homeowner may choose to treat it himself by treating the tree with over the counter soil drench products containing 1.47% midacloprid. These products are most effective when applied between April 1st and May 15th.

If the tree’s diameter at breast height is greater than 20 inches, care should be left to a professional. 

What can you do to help combat the EAB infestation?

  1. Remove weak and/or affected trees from your landscaping right away.
  2. If you see these symptoms, and EAB has not yet been found in your county, (you can check here) please call the Indiana DNR hotline at 1-866 NO EXOTIC (1-866-663-9684). This helps the DNR keep track of the beetle’s activity and the extent of the infestation. Your private information is not shared.
  3. NEVER move firewood from region to region — this can perpetuate the spread of the infestation.
  4. When planning your landscaping and planting trees, think variety. A variety of trees helps making your landscaping more resilient to such infestations. Buy local, kiln-dried firewood.

Landscape Solutions provides services related to this infestation, from prevantative treatment to tree removal and replacement as appropriate. CONTACT US for more information. 

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