Benefits of Using Bulbs in Your Central Indiana Landscape

  • Variety — height, color, bloom time, light requirements — whatever you are looking for, you are likely to be able to find a bulb type that will satisfy your needs. When you mention bulbs, everyone thinks of daffodils, lillies, and hyacinths, but the array of choices is practially limitless.
  • Low Maintenance — planting bulbs is relatively quick, easy, and practically fool-proof. Follow the directions on the packaging for planting depth, spacing, soil prep (if any), and sunlight requirements. Or, refer to the bulb planting guide from Purdue University’s horticultural department referenced at the end of this article.
  • Design Options — the hardest (but also the most fun) part of planting bulbs is planning a design. If bulbs are carefully chosen, a gardener is rewarded with constant blooms of color. As one specimen finishes flowering, another is just getting started. Use the guide at the end of this article to plan your endless garden. Clusters of bulbs have a powerful, colorful impact in a garden.
  • Cost Effectiveness — although you want to purchase your bulbs from a reputable nursery or catalog, most varieties are inexpensive, especially when weighed against the beautiful payoff the investment will yield in the spring.

Things to Consider When Planting Bulbs

  • Soil Drainage — bulbs that are planted in poorly drained soil will rot.
  • Planting Depth — it is important to plant the bulb at the proper depth. Generally, a bulb should be planted to the depth of 2 1/2 to 3 times the bulb’s largest diameter, but refer to the instructions for your specific bulb to be sure. Plant bulbs with the pointy end pointing up. Some varieties have a very obvious pointy end, others do not. The beautiful thing is that in most cases, even if you don’t get the bulb planted exactly right, the flower will still find it’s way to the surface.
  • Plant Height — this is important when planning your garden. If you plant a taller plant in front of a shorter one, you will not be able to enjoy the shorter one. Consider how the height of each plant will affect the final product.
  • Pests and Insects — bulbs can fall prey to chipmunks, grubs, or any number of different pests. Rodents may be controlled with traps and insects with pesticides. You may even consider placing a chicken wire “cage” around your bulbs to protect them.
  • Bulb Disease — bulbs are most pront to fungal disease. This can be controlled with the application of fungicide, or by moving the bed each year, as fungal disease tends to thrive when bulbs are left to bloom in the same place year after year. Avoid planting diseased bulbs, which can be identified by softness, decay, or yellowish lesions.
  • Zone Suitability — research the best varieties of bulbs to plan in your specific area for the best results. Refer to the bulb planting guide at the end of this article for advice.

Bulbs can be planted in central Indiana any time before the ground freezes, which, in the greater Indianapolis area, is usually around the end of October. So, after you are finished raking the leaves, get out the trowel and plant some bulbs. At the end of a long, cold, snowy Indianapolis winter, the green sprouts and beautiful flowers will announce the arrival of a beautiful Indiana spring. 

Learn More About Planting Fall Bulbs in Central Indiana

  • Flowering Bulbs from the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service, West Lafayette, Indiana

Plant Bulbs Now, Enjoy Beautiful Colors in the Spring

Benefits of Using Bulbs in Your Central Indiana Landscape

  • Variety — height, color, bloom time, light requirements — whatever you are looking for, you are likely to be able to find a bulb type that will satisfy your needs. When you mention bulbs, everyone thinks of daffodils, lillies, and hyacinths, but the array of choices is practially limitless.
  • Low Maintenance — planting bulbs is relatively quick, easy, and practically fool-proof. Follow the directions on the packaging for planting depth, spacing, soil prep (if any), and sunlight requirements. Or, refer to the bulb planting guide from Purdue University’s horticultural department referenced at the end of this article.
  • Design Options — the hardest (but also the most fun) part of planting bulbs is planning a design. If bulbs are carefully chosen, a gardener is rewarded with constant blooms of color. As one specimen finishes flowering, another is just getting started. Use the guide at the end of this article to plan your endless garden. Clusters of bulbs have a powerful, colorful impact in a garden.
  • Cost Effectiveness — although you want to purchase your bulbs from a reputable nursery or catalog, most varieties are inexpensive, especially when weighed against the beautiful payoff the investment will yield in the spring.

Things to Consider When Planting Bulbs

  • Soil Drainage — bulbs that are planted in poorly drained soil will rot.
  • Planting Depth — it is important to plant the bulb at the proper depth. Generally, a bulb should be planted to the depth of 2 1/2 to 3 times the bulb’s largest diameter, but refer to the instructions for your specific bulb to be sure. Plant bulbs with the pointy end pointing up. Some varieties have a very obvious pointy end, others do not. The beautiful thing is that in most cases, even if you don’t get the bulb planted exactly right, the flower will still find it’s way to the surface.
  • Plant Height — this is important when planning your garden. If you plant a taller plant in front of a shorter one, you will not be able to enjoy the shorter one. Consider how the height of each plant will affect the final product.
  • Pests and Insects — bulbs can fall prey to chipmunks, grubs, or any number of different pests. Rodents may be controlled with traps and insects with pesticides. You may even consider placing a chicken wire “cage” around your bulbs to protect them.
  • Bulb Disease — bulbs are most pront to fungal disease. This can be controlled with the application of fungicide, or by moving the bed each year, as fungal disease tends to thrive when bulbs are left to bloom in the same place year after year. Avoid planting diseased bulbs, which can be identified by softness, decay, or yellowish lesions.
  • Zone Suitability — research the best varieties of bulbs to plan in your specific area for the best results. Refer to the bulb planting guide at the end of this article for advice.

Bulbs can be planted in central Indiana any time before the ground freezes, which, in the greater Indianapolis area, is usually around the end of October. So, after you are finished raking the leaves, get out the trowel and plant some bulbs. At the end of a long, cold, snowy Indianapolis winter, the green sprouts and beautiful flowers will announce the arrival of a beautiful Indiana spring. 

Learn More About Planting Fall Bulbs in Central Indiana

  • Flowering Bulbs from the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service, West Lafayette, Indiana

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